Thursday, February 28, 2008

Just playing with primary colours, collage and machine stitching on 300g/m2 watercolour paper. 6.5"x6.5"

I love this spotted scarf. In the September/October 07 issue of the English magazine Embroidery, there is an article about the development of these spotted bandanas. Glasgow, Scotland was a textile centre in the 1800's and there was a Red Society devoted to seeking better ways of dying light-fast and wash-proof red fabrics. In 1785 the dye known as Turkey red (or Smyrna or Adrianople) found its way to Glasgow. In 1802, Henry Monteith began producing bandanas, bleaching out the white spots, instead of tye-dying, and achieving a rate of 224 every 10 minutes. They became a popular neckware and were taken to America by Scots forced from the Highlands during the Clearances. In America, many moved west, droving cattle - and so the cowboy with the red-spotted scarf became part of history.

6 comments:

laureline said...

Alison, I'm always so happy to see an update on your blog. This painting is so well composed, with its strong interlocking shapes and interesting negative space. The various textures work well with your primary color palette, too. And, as with your memory paintings, you've given us a history lesson, too!

Tami said...

Yeah! Another painting! I love the information that you add to your sketches. This bit of history is really interesting. I love the colors in this too>

Thanks for stopping by and commenting. A lot of the stuff that gets washed up here, get broken to bits by the power of the waves.

Lost In Wonder said...

I love this painting as well. I'm a sucker for bright primary colors. But, also, the story that came along with it was very informative but also entertaining.

Sandy said...

Very nice.

sandy

Penny said...

The bandana's my Uncles wore here in Australia were either blue or red but with three interlinked spots. In the 50's when I began riding after stock we got them from RM Williams, Stockman's supplier, 5 Percy St Prospect South Australia, and they were stockman's suppliers in those days, not fancy trendy wear as they are now.

Student with Asperger's said...

That looks great, really cleverly done! I love the shading on the lemon.


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